Tenth Judicial Circuit Receives Award

January 03, 2019
Picture from the Ralls County Courthouse in New London--O'Toole Awards
reception on December 4, 2018:   Left to Right:  Judge Rachel Bringer
Shepherd, Deputy Clerk Clerk Karen Huff; attorney James Ochs; Deputy Clerk
Kelsey Caldwell; Attorney Branson Wood; Deputy Clerk Roseanne Epperson;
attorney Mark Wasinger, Circuit Clerk Gina Jameson; attorney Gareth
Cooksey; Court Reporter Missy Lane,; attorney Joe Brannon; attorney James
Lemon; attorney John Hark Picture from the Ralls County Courthouse in New London--O'Toole Awards
reception on December 4, 2018: Left to Right: Judge Rachel Bringer
Shepherd, Deputy Clerk Clerk Karen Huff; attorney James Ochs; Deputy Clerk
Kelsey Caldwell; Attorney Branson Wood; Deputy Clerk Roseanne Epperson;
attorney Mark Wasinger, Circuit Clerk Gina Jameson; attorney Gareth
Cooksey; Court Reporter Missy Lane,; attorney Joe Brannon; attorney James
Lemon; attorney John Hark

Judge Rachel Bringer Shepherd has announced that during the first week of

December 2018, the attorneys and court personnel of the Tenth Judicial

Circuit celebrated receiving the Daniel O'Toole Award for Fiscal Year 2017.

The Tenth Judicial Circuit includes Ralls, Marion, and Monroe Counties.

Presiding Judge Rachel Bringer Shepherd provided snacks prior to the Law

Days at the Ralls County Courthouse in New London, the Marion County

Courthouses in Hannibal and Palmyra, and the Monroe County Courthouse in

Paris to celebrate the achievement. The Tenth Circuit also received the

O'Toole Award for Fiscal Year 2011, Fiscal Year 2012, Fiscal Year 2013,

Fiscal Year 2014, Fiscal Year 2015, and Fiscal Year 2016.

The O’Toole Award is given to circuits for efficiently managing and

processing cases. Missouri’s case-processing time standards, which became

effective in 1997, serve as guidelines for the time various kinds of cases

should take to handle. For example, half of civil cases should be disposed

within twelve months, and ninety percent of civil cases should be disposed

within eighteen months. The guidelines recognize that some cases are more

complex and require more time; and they are designed as tools to achieve

the overall goals of efficiency, productivity, and quality of justice.

The O’Toole Award, named for the late judge’s service as the first chair of

the time standards monitoring committee, recognizes the success of the

circuits in handling cases in a timely manner. Judge Shepherd stated, "This

award is the result of cooperation and diligence by all members of the

Tenth Circuit Bar Association, court personnel, and agencies that partner

with the court. I am very grateful for the continued teamwork that has

allowed the Tenth Circuit to receive this honor."